The #100DaysOfCode Interview

I asked people from the worldwide developer community who were taking part in the #100DaysOfCode challenge to take a quick 8 questions interview from me online. Twitter is full of great people and content soon-to-be developers and is the perfect place to look to get a perspective to what it’s like to take the challenge.

Additional questions contain great feedback for people who want to take the challenge, some motivation, the highs, and lows. Advice for good content to help you on the way through the challenge and much more.

So, first and foremost, what questions were in the interview? Let’s see below –

  • Why did you start #100DaysOfCode?
  • How did you get started? What websites have you been using, etc?
  • How are you finding it in terms of difficulty?
  • Have you struggled with motivation throughout the challenge & how have you dealt with it?
  • What is your ultimate goal to take away from doing the #100DaysOfCode challenge?
  • What advice would you give to people who are considering the #100DaysOfCode challenge but are maybe not fully confident enough to commit?
  • What advice would you give to others currently on the #100DaysOfCode challenge?
  • Are there any great resources that helped you and you would like to share?

I think these questions are perfect to get a good idea of why people are doing the challenge, how hard it is, is it tough to keep up to the day-to-day grind, plus advice and motivation for others!

Let’s see the answers –

Q1:  Why did you start #100DaysOfCode?

I’d like to change my career.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
To motivate me to do code outside of working hours
By: @crazyjack12
I wanted to increase my network
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
Because I needed some sort of external motivation to keep learning
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
to be consistent with coding practices.. personal and professional projects are not included
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
To make coding a part of my every day, get to know people with similar stories and interest, find out new resources.
By: Lexie
Work reduce and I wish can transfer, from zero to start learn.
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
To publicize my journey as a student Developer and encourage others who aspire to do the same.
By: @Code4Blessings
I was just learning to code when I found #100DaysOfCode. I was looking for a way to engage with the community and keep myself on track and this challenge turned out to be great for both of those things.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Desire to regain some of the technical computing knowledge
By: @sumofmybooks
I wanted to find a community with like-minded people, ’cause coding sometimes can be lonely.
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
To help me stay motivated and to help keep up with my work
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
I thought it seemed like a great way to keep myself accountable in my learning, and to reach out to the community on Twitter.
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
I wanted to encourage myself to keep coding every day.
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
Because I used to have a hard time motivating myself and being consistent. I wanted to become a better programmer in the hopes I can get my own business going. I’m disabled and felt like I was ‘just being here’ and needed to feel like I had a purpose.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
I started the #100daysofcode so I could find a community to help me along on my journey. It’s a great way to make connections with other developers – both new and old!
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
I wanted to use this challenge to learn more useful tools and to apply them in my personal and professional projects.
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
After I got discharged from the military(Korean mandatory service), I switched my major over from biology to web programming. Although I have been coding on and off for years, I didn’t feel like I had the skills nor knowledge to catch up to the class material. I also knew if I didn’t have any means to keep myself in check, I would end up stop working on coding. I guess it was a way of forcefully keeping myself in track, because not everyone falls in love with coding immediately.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
When I started I was coding daily. I found this challenge as a great way to keep myself motivated and also keep track of my progress.
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
To maintain continuity so I can learn better and more.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q2:  How did you get started? What websites have you been using, etc?

I’ve been using Udemy, Free Code Camp and YouTube channels.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
alligator.io github.com vuejs
By: @crazyjack12
Freecodecamp, coding blocks
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
I started last year using freeCodeCamp. I am now working on prep work to attend Flatiron School this Fall.
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
i saw some tweets. that’s all. no freecodecamp craps
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
A textbook on Web Design from O’Reilly (Helped me with foundational HTML and CSS basics) Udemy course, freeCodeCamp.
By: Lexie
I’m looking for what suitable for me, learn freecodecamp and sololearn
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
Udemy, YouTube, Freecodecamp.org
By: @Code4Blessings
I’ve used Codecademy, freeCodeCamp, Udemy and YouTube. I started with Codeacademy, and quickly realized that there were tons of free resources online that covered similar things. I still wouldn’t trade the experience and support that Codecademy offers though, the support is crucial when you’re first starting and learning how to learn.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Books mostly, some Udemy. Started with basic books on Python, C, and Java.
By: @sumofmybooks
I’ve started learning how to code from the website w3shools.com, but later I found different resources, ’cause that works best for me.
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
I found the hashtag on twitter, looked into it a little and just started posting my daily progress.
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
I started with SoloLearn where I studied HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. I then moved onto FreeCodeCamp and “The Complete Web Developer Course 2.0”, and repeated the same subjects.
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
FreeCodeCamp mostly, MDN, YouTube, Dev.to, Medium
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
I used Udemy to start with (and still use occasionally) but as I’ve learned more, I have taken more to books and/or straight documentation
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
FreeCodeCamp to start. Now using Udemy courses
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
Vue Mastery, Udemy, Graphql and Flutter tutorials
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
I started out solving challenges on Free Code Camp. Codecademy was also one of my sources I have been using. I actually started using it again recently to teach myself SQL. I have also taken advantage of Udemy sales to purchase the lectures I needed.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
Started with Codecademy then switched to Freecodecamp. Later I started practicing daily at Codewars. Also, use Hackerrank and Leetcode from time to time.
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
I started learning threw youtube channel called ‘Hitesh Chaudhary’. Now I am learning threw many resources like FreeCodeCamp, Udemy, Courcera, Youtube.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q3: How are you finding it in terms of difficulty?

JavaScript is very difficult.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
Finding the time between lunch or before work starts or on the commute home are the only times I can get stuck into personal projects, without being heavily disturbed
By: @crazyjack12
Easy
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
It’s hard to learn on your own. Without a structured curriculum, it’s easy to jump around between resources or languages and get lost or distracted or confused
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
depends on the approach.. it’s sometimes hard, sometimes easier
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
very difficult. Keep losing my streaks due to disappearing motivation.
By: Lexie
JavaScript is too hard, must practice more
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
JavaScript was frustrating for me, in the beginning, because things kept breaking out of nowhere. However, I have learned if you stick with it, you get better, you learn more, and it gets easier with time.
By: @Code4Blessings
The challenge is definitely difficult, but certainly not impossible. I would sometimes count listening to a coding podcast as my “code” for the day during my commute if I couldn’t get to a computer that day. Getting creative with how you consume information definitely helps.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
The main difficulty is finding time each day.
By: @sumofmybooks
It’s not that difficult, I just don’t think too much about it.
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
My only issue is staying on top of it and quitting when I feel discouraged.
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
I repeated the same subjects multiple times because I wanted to make sure I had really learned as much as possible, but I’m still almost totally lost with JavaScript. For now, I am focusing on HTML and CSS, because I am not finding them as difficult. When I am more confident with those I will return my focus to JavaScript again.
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
Not difficult at all
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
This is my second round now; I had a hard time the first few weeks of my first #100Days but after doing it a while, I found myself in such a habit of doing it that when the 100 days were up, I still ended up programming daily.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
Medium to hard
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
It is difficult sometimes to allocate time for learning and coding due to work and family commitments
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
It varies from time to time. Following tutorials are easy. However, starting my own project and keeping it rolling still feels difficult.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
Doing what you love is not difficult at all!
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
In starting it seems tough but now it’s becoming easier to understand everything.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q4: Have you struggled with motivation throughout the challenge & how have you dealt with it?

I think I have strong motivation but I feel frustrated and dumb all the time.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
I code a lot daily, but it’s hard to justify some of the things I do as towards the personal goal
By: @crazyjack12
Sometimes I struggled. I told myself that I have been doing it for so long, I can’t skip it now.
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
Somewhat. I failed the first time around because I put too much pressure on myself.
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
i struggle daily.. this challenge is never the reason. it’s a part of my daily routine
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
Many times. I thought accountability by posting on Twitter every day of what I’ve done would be helpful. Never was. After a week or two, I would ruin my streak.
Now, I just cross a day in a real-life calendar on my desk with pink if i did code, and in black if i didn’t.
By: Lexie
Yes, I struggle to learn and sometimes feel tried, Rest is my better and practice is good.
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
The motivation was never a problem for me. If you love what you do, it doesn’t feel like work and therefore you don’t need motivation. However, reading people‚Äôs success stories online always helped.
By: @Code4Blessings
Motivation is definitely a factor–it’s a lot like going to the gym though. The hardest part is starting, once you get into it it’s much easier to make it through an hour. I tell myself “Code for 5 minutes at least. If you don’t feel like continuing, then stop”. 9 times out of 10 I keep going for the full hour. If I miss a day, I don’t beat myself up, I just get back to it and continue the challenge.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Yes. The twitter community is supportive. Ultimately it is a marathon that each of must complete by themselves.
By: @sumofmybooks
Actually, I didn’t. I was just tired sometimes. But that’s fine. I had some previous coding experience, and a habit of coding every day. I joined the challenge to better myself.
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
Yes, many many MANY times. This is probably my fourth time trying because, In the past, I have felt discouraged and unmotivated so I‚Äôd stop coding. The first time I did it I stopped coding for months, I felt I wasn’t good at it or it wasn’t for me. But a year later I tried it again and ultimately got my first certification on FreeCodeCamp
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
No. I find the challenge itself to be motivational. I enjoy posting each day and interacting with others who are participating. I am especially motivated by the posts of people who are much more advanced or experienced because I want to reach their level and do what they do!
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
I struggle with it sometimes but I’ll enjoy completing goals. Coding every day is my goal and I continue to do it to complete my goal.
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
Some days I did have a hard time, yes. There weren’t honestly very many but when I did have them, I would simply force myself to get started. Once I got going, it was never an issue to continue for that day.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
Its tough. Some days I have all the motivation in the world and some days I don’t even want to look at code. When that happens I take breaks. I keep up with twitter and read articles until I get super pumped again.
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
By asking yourself why you want to do it in the first place and keeping your eyes on the goal
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
I have struggled quite often. Whenever I lose motivation for what I’m learning, I try learning a new language. Other learners might say it’s better to concentrate on one language. However, I look at learning programming as learning the fundamental concepts that are irrelevant to the type of language. For example, recursion, architecture, loops, constants, OOP are concepts that exist in multiple programming languages. I think it doesn’t hurt to learn different concepts with different languages. It sometimes helps to solidify concepts that I didn’t understand before.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
There were a few bad days when I could not solve a single challenge but discipline kept me going.
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
As I am from a Hindi(native language) medium school, it is very difficult for me to learn because there are two big challenges for me: 1. Learn English 2. Learn how to code. But i am giving my best. I hope i will improve myself more.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q5: What is your ultimate goal to take away from doing the #100DaysOfCode challenge?

Get a new job.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
encourages a lot of people to get into coding, motivates current devs to expand the technologies they use
By: @crazyjack12
More knowledge and more people that I know.
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
That I can do anything I set my mind to. And also seeing the progress from 100 days of learning.
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
consistent practice
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
The knowledge I would acquire by making coding a habit.
By: Lexie
My knowledge and can understand
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
To land a high paying job as a Software Engineer.
By: @Code4Blessings
The ultimate goal, I think, is to make coding a normal part of your everyday life. Whether you do it for work, as a hobby, or are studying to get a job someday, being able to find the time and sit down for an hour and work on a project is actually a huge skill to learn. To be able to turn off the noise for that one hour and get down to business can actually be extremely productive and useful.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Plugging the gaps in my technical knowledge. Ability to code with confidence and use it to solve problems for friends and family.
By: @sumofmybooks
The first time I took the challenge it was to find a coding community, but the second time is to stay a part of it
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
My goal is to keep working and keep learning. I hope to have my first web development job in the next year or so and if I keep up with 100DaysOfCode it will help me get there faster. Aiming for that 100th day is what will keep me motivated.
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
I hope to have a decent grasp of JavaScript by the end of my 100 days. I would also like to create a portfolio where I can show some of the projects I have completed during my challenge.
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
Work as a web developer!
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
This current round, I’m reading two very lengthy books on a game engine that just came out with a revamped version. I hope that by the end of the challenge, I will have already started on development on my first retail game.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
Land a dev job eventually, but also make coding a habit.
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
Being a better and more productive and knowledgeable coder
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
Being a college student looking at graduation in a year, my ultimate goal is to acquire the skills to be able to build projects for myself that are impressive enough to catch recruiters’ eyes.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
Key take away is that with continuous practice everybody becomes better. For example, I used to struggle with Regular expressions. For a month I read and solved only regular expression problems and now I am comfortable with them.
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
My main goal is to complete core and advance JavaScript, HTML/CSS.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q6: What advice would you give to people who are considering the #100DaysOfCode challenge but are maybe not fully confident enough to commit?

Just do it, but ask questions about where to start and what courses to choose. Don’t be afraid of asking questions.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
Use online resources to help guide you through tutorials, etc
By: @crazyjack12
It’s easy. You just have to take out at least one hour. One hour is not that much bro.
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
You can make up your own rules and time commitments. Don’t be afraid to bend the rules to fit your circumstances.
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
it’s not a challenge. it’s an easier way to get started and continue
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
Just try it. Even if it doesn’t work for you, you don’t have anything to lose, cause you probably didn’t have much, to begin with.
By: Lexie
First, you must go to google to look for everyone’s methods before you want to do the front-end or back-end. You can from this place look who the anyway and how to learn, don’t give yourself pressure, and happily learn the code.
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
Learn how to take time for yourself to do this. It’s only a minimum of an hour each day (which is just enough to hook you for a few more hours). What I usually do is wake up at 5 am before everyone wakes up, and do my coding then. This way there are no interruptions.
By: @Code4Blessings
Like I mentioned before, commit to yourself to at least code for 5 minutes every day, and you’ll almost always end up doing way more once you get sucked in. There’s also really no way to “fail” the challenge–make the challenging work for you. As long as you’re committing to push yourself and work towards your goals, the challenge is worth doing.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Don’t think about it too much. Try it. If you fail, understand why and try again. The only real failure is giving up long term.
By: @sumofmybooks
You should try it ’cause it will help you build a habit of coding everyday day and you will meet new, like-minded people.
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
Go for it and work hard. Worst-case scenario you miss a couple of days and that‚Äôs fine. You just have to keep going at it until you achieve your goal. It’s okay to fail, it‚Äôs okay to feel like you‚Äôre doing it wrong or feel unmotivated, that‚Äôs what happens when you‚Äôre learning. You have a whole community of nice, smart and funny people on your side rooting for you no matter what you do. Find a 100DaysOfCode buddy to help you stay motivated or on your feet.
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
The commitment has been the best part of this challenge for me. It helps to stay focused, motivated and accountable, and all of those things have helped me to improve. So my advice would be to just give it a go!
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
It‚Äôs not as hard as it seems. It‚Äôs simply finding a little time in a day to do some coding. Don’t give up! No matter how rough it gets, it will be worth your time!
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
If there are goals in life you want to see hit, the only way you will ever see those realized is putting in the time and effort to make them a reality. Doing this challenge will build habits that will last with you through the rest of your career and it’s one of the best achievements of my life is having the discipline to finish my first 100 Days.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
Just do it. There’s nothing to lose.
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
It’s a personal challenge. There is no one to report to except yourself. Most importantly, do you want to do it for yourself?
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
I think many people hesitate because of the fact that they have to commit at least an hour every day. I understand that not everyone has that much time nor motivation from the get-go. I’m actually also on #300DaysOfCode challenge. If I remember correctly, that challenge states that working on code for 3 min a day is even okay. There are times when I only work on code for about 20 min. It may sound too short to do anything, but at those times, my goal is to at least type something to keep myself from forgetting how to code. You don’t have to make huge leaps. Small steps every day are what counts.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
My advice is to start and never give up. 100 days pass very fast. After that at least you will know that if you commit to something you will achieve it.
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
In my advice, it is very great to take #100DaysOfCode challenge, but the big thing is to commit it. You just have to maintain continuity and work hard.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q7: What advice would you give to others currently on the #100DaysOfCode challenge?

Don’t give up.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
To tell the majority to do stop only getting stuck into JavaScript and explore other programming languages, learn both front and backend technologies, get more involved in adopting serverless technologies, play around with available cloud hosting services and use all possible free tiers, I.e AWS
By: @crazyjack12
Just complete it. I left after 97th day. I still regret.
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
Keep up the amazing work! You’ve committed to doing something to better yourself, and even just that is commendable.
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
keep going.. keep the steps small. but keep going
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
The only person you need to satisfy is yourself.
By: Lexie
You believe yourself keep is good.
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
It helps yourself and others to post your progress whether it‚Äôs good or bad. You have no idea how inspiring your story can be. Also keep in mind, potential employers read your progress too. So keep coding, posting, and most of all, DON’T GIVE UP!!!
By: @Code4Blessings
I got my current web developer job almost entirely because of my involvement in #100DaysOfCode. It puts you out there, lets employers and others in the community know that you’re passionate, that you’re pushing yourself, and that you really enjoy and care about coding and building things. Most people would never log their journey of learning anything new, but this is your chance to put it out there and get out of your comfort zone. It’s also SUPER fun to go back and see what you were doing at day 1 versus where you are now. It’s easy to lose sight of how much progress you’ve made, but looking back at your start really highlights this.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Only compare your progress to where you were previously. Not to anyone else.
By: @sumofmybooks
Just don’t give up.
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
WE GOT THIS!! Just keep your head up and work hard, we’ll achieve our goals and when we do, we can throw a twitter cocktail party
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
The best advice I’ve had so far in my challenge is to stop buying new courses and to just start building things. Learn as you create!
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
KEEP CODING but don’t feel bad if you miss a day or only managed a little coding. Breaks are ok, as long as you never give up on your coding journey.
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
Know when to walk away and take a break. Also, don’t be afraid to throw away what “doesn’t work”; I have countless half-baked projects that will never go anywhere but the experience making those sticks with me.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
We’ll get there.
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
Just do it ! Pick a language and work on something. When you do a project then you will find out what you don’t know or need to brush up on .
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
At times when you want to give up, just make your self type a line of code then see where it goes. If you still want to get up and leave, feel free to do so. If you want to keep going, be my guest. Just try typing that single line of code.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
Never, never, never give up (Winston Churchill)
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
Work harder, Stay motivated, Be positive, Maintain continuity.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Q8: Are there any great resources that helped you and you would like to share?

Udemy, Twitter #100DatsOfCode, Free Code Camp, and attend local meetups.
By: Anusha, @anushatylee
AWS SAM, alligator.io , stackoverflow, bootstrap vue
By: @crazyjack12
Freecodecamp
By: Sakshi Shreya, shreyasakshi96
freeCodeCamp, Dev.to and the #codenewbies Twitter community. Also Traversy Media and Coding Train on YouTube.
By: Emily, @thecodepixi
nothing but hardwork.. and specifics depends on the subject
By: — .-. .-.-.- .–. .- – .. . -. – , @arunavaskar
Free Code Camp, Forum on the Colt Steele’s Udemy beginner course for web development.
By: Lexie
Freecodecamp and sololearn and codepen can look everyone how to learn or YouTube can help learn,Because sololearn can give small test keep you know is right. Another YouTube Because there are subtitles to watch for Deaf.
By: Wen Chi Yu, @WenChiYu28
YouTube and Freecodecamp.org
By: @Code4Blessings
I mentioned some earlier, freeCodeCamp, Udemy, Codecademy. Get familiar with the MDN Docs, listen to SyntaxFM, CodeNewbie, Front End Happy Hour and ShopTalk podcasts, read CSS Tricks, and watch some conference talks on YouTube. So many great resources.
By: Tom Raley, @tom_raley, https://tomraley.dev
Books. Tutorials, courses, etc are goo resources. For me, books give a depth of teaching that is unmatched by other media.
By: @sumofmybooks
W3shools, YouTube, Scrimba
By: Danijela, @DanijelaJs
W3Schools.com, UDEMY, FreeCodeCamp, developer.mozilla.org
By: Raelyn Brown, @codingvirgo
My favorite resource at the moment is the YouTube channel from Traversy Media. His videos are extremely helpful, and the challenges with walkthrough videos are fun for me.
By: Jaimie Lee, @jl_webdev
FreeCodeCamp
By: Julie, @JewelsGalvan
I don’t have a single resource that I would recommend. I used a variety of resources (udemy, videos, blog posts, books, articles, etc) and I found all of them to be useful in their own way. My greatest resources were actually Twitter and the #100DaysOfCode community; making daily posts and seeing what everyone else was working on kept me constantly motivated.
By: Troy Martin, @beef_studios
By: Diane, @DianeCodedIt
The twitter community and their willingness to answer questions and support you in your journey. I feel that community support is important.
By: Alvin Loh, @AlvinLoh19
learn.freecodecamp.org and codecademy.com is a great way to get yourself started. After that, see if you have interests in other areas and try searching for it on Youtube. It’s full of quality videos. When you have a topic that you want to dive deeper into, try udemy.com when the lectures go on sale. Although Youtube videos are great, I feel like top-ranked lectures on udemy tend to have better structure. Last but not least, Stackoverflow. There are many geniuses out there that are willing to help you out.
By: Ryan Kim, @RyanK_HW , http://www.ryandevelops.me/
Mostly MDN.com, devdocs.io.
By: Nick Haras, @mac_experts
There are many great resources out there, some of my favorite ones are: FreeCodeCamp , LearnCodeOnline.in , Traversy Media and many greate Youtube channels.
By: Suhel Hasan, @suhelhasan11

Summary

The answers here give an epic perspective to what it’s like undertaking the challenge from people all around the world. It’s actually really eye-opening reading the answers, especially when some people are doing the challenge for the raw love of learning!

Some people want the ultimate goal of being a dev in industry, and if you think about it, these people will end up with that goal, putting in the effort with this challenge, it’s extremely admirable.

Hopefully, this article of interview questions will help clear up some unanswered questions for people who want to undertake the challenge and also help motivate them to take that leap.

Thanks To…

Lastly, I want to give a special thanks to everyone who participated and spared some time out of their day to share their experiences.

Be sure to check them out on Twitter & check out their websites!!!

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The Author: Dan Englishby

The #100DaysOfCode Interview

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